Tag Archives: Wheelock

Wheelock’s in Western Australia

We arrive at the 6th of Blog and a change of pace from Latin America and United Kingdom, my research has also to taken me to Western Australia where most Australian Wheelock’s originate.

I will return to the Origins of Wheelock in the next blog but it has taken me longer to write up. This an extract of the research which I am just starting to build a picture but it will take me sometime.

We do know the two migrants came from Ireland and settled in the Colony of Western Australia, previously known as the Swan River Colony in 1839.

Extract taken from “The Bicentennial Dictionary of Western Australians Pre 1829-1888”

WHEELOCK, John, b. County Wexford, Ireland c.1822, d 4.12.1888 (Chapman Bay district), arr 20.4.1839 per Hindoo  with brother (George or James), m 3.6.1840 (Perth) Elizabeth Matilda BARRON, dtr of Edward & Jane, d 21.1.1866 (Ellen).  Chd Isaac b August1842, Edward b July 1844 (d May 1846), John Boxwell b April 1845 & bp 1845, John b July 1847, Jane Pearson b June 1848 d 1934, Samuel b August1850 (Toodyay), James b 1852, Elizabeth Matilda b 1853 d 1938.  Farmer & grazier, tenant at Toodyay 1840’s & 1850’s at “Roesland”.  Greenough, Champion Bay 1860’s.

WHEELOCK, Charles Thomas, B 6th of January 1858 Toodyay, d 15.5.1916,  m 16.6.1885 (Carnarvon) Jessie Nevin McJANNET.  Chd Elizabeth b 1886 d 1964 ((carnarvon owned drapery store), Darcy, Gerald d 1964 Shepherd at Irwin, drover  of flocks into Gascoyne district.  In patnership with C J Gooch, established “Wandagee Station” 1880.  Was at meeting there when 1st Gascoyne Rd. Bd. was formed 1882.  To Carnarvon, built “Red House” 1883.  Town council employee as well  at station manager, town butcher, Presbyt.

WHEELCOK, Edmond, son of John & Elizabeth (nee BARRON), m 1st 23.5.1883 (RC Geraldton) Margaret HENNESSY b 1864, dtr of Loughlan, m. 2nd 26.1.1888 Rosanna Agnes Mcdonnell B 2.6.1864 d. 22.1.1906, dtr of John & Ellen (nee McCABE).  Droverr & labourer Mt Magnet.

WHEELOCK, Edward, b 1854 m Mary Ann b 1854.  Chd Veronica Maud b 1891 d 1891 (Champion Bay district).  Mounted Police Constable Albany 1879-1884.  Transferred to Bunbury 10.9.1884, resigned 1.2.1885 having been appointed to “Mt Wittenoom”.

WHEELOCK, Elizabeth Matilda, b 1853, dtr of John, m 1873 Thomas BROAD

WHEELOCK, George (=?James), arr 20.4.1839 per HINDOO  with brother John.  Employed as a caretaker Middle Swan district.

WHEELOCK, Isaac, b 8.1842, son of John & Elizabeth Matilda (nee BARRON), of Greenough, employed a s T/L labourer 1868.

WHEELOCK, James.  Witness at marriage of John Wheelock 3.6.1840 (Perth).

WHEELOCK, James Lowe White, Bp 29.3.1852, son of John & Elizabeth Matilda (nee BARRON).  m 6.4.1893 (Dongara) Florence Josephine FOGARTY, b 1868, dtr of Joseph & Harriet.  Farmer, Greenough (1884-6 Alm).

WHEELOCK, Jane Pearson, b 1848 dtr of John, m Thomas CRAINE

WHEELOCK, John b 7.1847, son of John & Elizabeth Matilda (Nee BARRON), m ?Maria HOGAN, chd. Edward.

WHEELOCK, Margaret, d .19.6.1883 (Geraldton).

In a different edition of this book it states:

WHEELOCK G. “ ……..Was employed as a Caretaker in the Middle Swan district”

WHEELOCK John “………In November 1840 signed a petition with his wife for a Methodist minister’s stipend at Perth.  Was mentioned in the 1849 Toodyay census as a farmer.  In 1850 signed a petition for a publican’s licence at Toodyay.

 Obituary Charles Thomas Wheelock

The late Charles Thomas Wheelock was born at Newcastle, now called Toodyay, in the Northam district, on January 6, 1858. As a young man he worked on the station of the late Mr. C. D. V.

Foss, who was later Resident Magistrate of Gascoyne Police District. At nineteen years of age, with the late Charlie Brockman, he journeyed to Boolathana from the Upper Irwin (now Mingenew). In

1879 he brought sheep to Doorawarrah, for Messrs. Gale and McNeil, and in 1880 he entered into partnership with the late Mr. G. J. Gooch, at Wandagee station.

It was on July 30, 1880, that the two partners discovered Wandagee. Up to that time no white man had ever trod on this part of the State. On the station they placed 2,000 sheep in November, 1860. About five years later

Mr.Wheelock sold out his interest in Wandagee and settled in Carnarvon, where he established a butchering business. It is now being conducted by the Carnarvon Traders, after passing through many hands.

While settled in Carnarvon he married Miss Jessie Nevin, daughter of the late

Williiam Hogan McJannett, and two sons and five daughters comprised his family,

most of them living today in Carnarvon district.

The late Mr. Wheelock was a grandson of Major Barron, a pioneer of this State whose wife is said to be the first white woman to arrive in Western Australia.

Although a resident of Carnarvon for many years, Mr. Wheelock took no active part in public affairs of the town and district. He was a keen lover of the bush, where he spent the major part of his life engaged in pastoral pursuits. He was a man of happy disposition. No matter what the hardship and difficulties he would always face them with a joke and a good hearty laugh. In that spirit he lived and helped very largely in the settlement of the Gascoyne.

 

The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Finishing the month with my fourth blog and starting with my next series I will discuss the origins of Wheelock name and its evolution. In 2016 Oxford University Press published this huge dictionary and according to them is the ultimate reference work on family names of the UK, covering English, Scottish, Welsh, Irish, Cornish, and immigrant surnames.

It includes every surname that currently has more than 100 bearers, and those that had more than 20 bearers in the 1881 census.

It also explains the historical background, formation, and typology of surnames and a guide to surnames research and family history research. Additional material also includes a list of published and unpublished lists of surnames from the Middle Ages to the present day.

Having given the Dictionary a plugging what have I found for the Wheelock’s reinforces some my own research even though I have some alternative definitions but that’s for next blog and my reasons.

The accepted definition of the origins of the Wheelock name is:

The Name of the village is first recorded as Hoileck, and Hoiloch in the Domesday book then Changed in 1316 to Quelock and again in 1382 to Whelock, in 1384 to Welock, finally in 1390 it seems to have settled, and recorded as Wheelock as it is known today. The main reason for changes stem from people spelling as they sound it.

The word come from the word Chevel-og meaning winding, twisting, turning and the conclusions seem to be the river with its many twists and turns until they reach the central body of the river outside the village. Sketch of the locks: (History of Sandbach and District”, Cyril Massey, Published 1982).

Here are pages from the dictionary with details from the Wheelock name and variations:


A more obscure definition of the name is as follows: The development of Wellock via Wailock, Wallock from walok in 1379. This is the form which requires investigation and the evidence suggests that it was a diminutive of a personal or Christian name “Wal”. This may have been meaningless when used in the 1300s, but etymologically it is probably the Old High German word “walh” meaning “stranger” or “foreigner”.

Next Week: Alternative Definitions of Wheelock and it’s origins.

 

 

Fill in your chart

Hello everyone,

 

I know it has been a few weeks since I published something… Currently I am still working in digitising all relevant work before any new research is done as I am finding out that I am doubling up on research already undertaken.

 

To get many more of you involved I have attached 2 documents, you can use either one or both and fill in all your details and including any anecdotes. Send them to me directly and will add them to the digitisation that I am carrying out.

 

Have fun,

 

Thomas

6 Generation Pedigree Chart

 

Free Family Pedigree Chart Template

The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

I hope you now know how to call your nearest and dearest after last post! 🙂  or you if you meet an odd relative such as myself you know where I am on the family tree.

Moving forward to our next post in 2016 Patrick Hanks, Richard Coates, and Peter McClure published the ultimate reference work on family names of the UK. The Dictionary includes every surname that currently has more than 100 bearers. It is more than 3,136 Pages

Each entry contains lists of variant spellings of the name, an explanation of its origins (including the etymology), lists of early bearers showing evidence for formation and continuity from the date of formation down to the 19th century, geographical distribution, and, where relevant, genealogical and bibliographical notes, making this a fully comprehensive work on family names.

This authoritative guide also includes an introductory essay explaining the historical background, formation, and typology of surnames and a guide to surnames research and family history research. Additional material also includes a list of published and unpublished lists of surnames from the Middle Ages to the present day.

 The Dictionary covers the following:

·    Covers over 45,000 family names in the UK, including immigrant names

·    Each entry includes the current and 1881 frequencies of the name, its main GB location, and its language or culture of origin

·    Each main entry explains the name’s origins and history, supported by a selection of early bearers taken from a wide range of sources such as wills, tax records, court records, parish registers, Nonconformist circuit records, and many other documents

·    Entries for variants direct the reader to the main entry where the history and etymology of the name is covered

·    Contains a full list of published and unpublished sources consulted

·    Introductory essay explains the origin, history, and typology of family names in Britain, Ireland, and elsewhere in the world, the research methods used, the sources used. and some of the problems encountered in researching family names

·    Explains many surnames never previously explained and corrects many widely believed errors in the light of new evidence.

Without further Ado, I am attaching here information on the Wheelock’s origins, it is very technical but it also shows variations and origins of the name in their proper context and how the name has expanded.

Click on the PDF: Binder1

 

 

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